Great Designer: William Caslon

180px-Caslon_portraitWilliam Caslon, also known as William Caslon I (1692–1766-01-23) was an English gunsmith and designer of typefaces. He was born at Cradley, Worcestershire, and in 1716 started business in London as an engraver of gun locks and barrels, and as a bookbinder’s tool cutter. Having contact with printers, he was induced to fit up a type foundry, largely through the encouragement of William Bowyer. The distinction and legibility of his type secured him the patronage of the leading printers of the day in England and on the continent.

Caslon began his career as an apprentice to an engraver of gunlocks and barrels. In 1716 he opened his own engraving shop in London and soon began to make tools for bookbinders and silver chasers. When his work came to the attention of the printer John Watts, Caslon was given the task of cutting type punches for various presses in London. In 1720 he designed an “English Arabic” typeface used in a psalter and a New Testament. Two years later he cut excellent roman, italic, and Hebrew typefaces for the printer William Bowyer; the roman typeface, which was first used in 1726, later came to be called Caslon. The success of Caslon’s new typefaces in England was almost instantaneous, and, as a result, he received loans and sufficient trade to enable him to set up a complete typefoundry. From 1720 to 1780, few books were printed in England that did not use type from his foundry.

Caslon’s first specimen sheet was issued in 1734 and exhibited his roman and italic types in 14 different sizes. His types eventually spread all over Europe and the American colonies, where one of his fonts was used to print the Declaration of Independence. Caslon’s typefaces combined delicate modeling with a typically Anglo-Saxon vigour.

After 1735 Caslon’s eldest son, William (1720–88), joined him and by about 1742 had become a partner. Though the son lacked his father’s great abilities, he maintained the reputation of the firm and, with the aid of his wife, Elizabeth, managed it skillfully. After William’s death in 1788, the original Caslon & Son foundry was divided among his heirs.

Caslon-schriftmusterblatt

In 1998, Justin Howes reestablished the Caslon foundry, under the name H. W. Caslon & Company Limited, with an expanded version of ITC Founder’s Caslon as the company’s initial product. However, following the death of Justin Howes in 2005, the revived H.W. Caslon & Company was no longer in business, and the expanded Founders Caslon is no longer offered in retail market.

William Caslon in Wikipedia

Willam Caslon in Linotype

2 Comments

Filed under Typography Designer

2 responses to “Great Designer: William Caslon

  1. Great read. Its great to see the history of what we see in modern design and type.

  2. greatdesigners

    @printedproof, Thanks for the comment :)

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